Nun laßt uns gehn und treten

Text and Translations

Most likely written during the Thirty Years’ War. It first appeared in Crüger’s Praxis pietatis melica, 1653, no. 106, in 15 stanzas of 4 lines. Later in Ebeling’s Pauli Gerhardi Geistliche Andachten, 1666/67, no. 58, and Feustking’s Pauli Gerhardi Geistreiche Hauss- und Kirchen-Lieder, 1707, p. 20.

Nun laßt uns gehn und treten

Text | Crüger | Ebeling | Feustking


Now let each humble creature

In the Supplement to German Psalmody, 1765, p. 4, and Select Hymns from German Psalmody, Tranquebar, 1754, p. 7. Text | Scan

Year after year commenceth

In the Moravian Hymn Book, 1789, no. 507 (1849, no. 1106). Altered version of “Now Let Each Humble Creature” and beginning, “Year after year commenceth.” Omits stanzas 2, 3, 6–10, 12, 13. Text | Scan

O come with prayer and singing

Richard Massie in the British Herald, Jan., 1865, p. 8. Text | Scan

In prayer your voices raise ye

John Kelly, 1867, p. 45. Text | Scan

Christians all, with one accord

Edward Massie, 1867, p. 168. Omits stanzas 3 and 10. Text | Scan

With notes of joy and songs of praise

Robert Maguire, 1883, p. 24. Omits stanzas 6, 7, 9–11. Text | Scan


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